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Cortisol Free In Saliva ELISA Kit Maximize

Cortisol Free In Saliva ELISA Kit

Cortisol Free Saliva ELISA Kit (DES6611) is a quantitative method for measuring in-vitro concntrations of active cortisol-free in saliva.

More details

DES6611

96 wells

£ 280.00

Cortisol Free In Saliva ELISA Kit

Specificity : Human, Saliva
Sensitivity : 0.014 ng/ml
Assay Range : 0-30 ng/ml
Size: 96 tests

Reagents Supplied:
- Cortisol-Free Microtiter Plate [96 Wells]
- Cortisol-Free Calibrators [6 vials]
- Cortisol-Free  Controls [2 vials]
- Enzyme Conjugate [1x 7ml]
- Substrate Solution [2x 11ml]
- Stop Solution  [1x 7ml]
- Wash Solution  10x [1x 50ml]

Procedure:
- This cortisol free saliva ELISA kit is a competitive solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
- The microtiter wells have been coated with a polyclonal rabbit antibody which is directed against cortisol molecule.
- Cortisol that is present in the sample is then able to compete with a cortisol-horseradish peroxidase conjugate for binding to the coated antibody.
- Following the incubation period the unbound conjugate is washed off.
- Amount of bound peroxidase conjugate is inversely proportional to the concentration of cortisol in the sample.
- After addition of the substrate solution, the intensity of colour developed is inversely proportional to the concentration of cortisol in the patient sample.

Intended Use:
Cortisol Free Saliva ELISA Kit is a procedure of in vitro quantitative determination of active free cortisol in saliva samples.

Cross-reactivity:
Prednisolone   - 9.69%
Aldosterone   - 0.19%
Corticosterone   - 0.38%
Cortison   - 1.85%
11-Deoxycortisol  - 0.88%
Prednisone   - 0.40%
Dexamethasone, Estriol, Estrone, Progesterone, Danazole, 11-Deoxycorticosterone, Estradiol,
Pregnenolone  - 0.1%

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